Courses available in French

Courses

Il ne faut jamais avoir peur d’aller trop loin car la vĂ©ritĂ© est au-delĂ .

— Proust

2018 Spring

Graduate | Pedagogical

Undergraduate

1: Elementary French, first semester

S. Chavdarian in charge

Introduction to Francophone cultures through speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French, with French as the exclusive means of communication. Emphasis is placed on developing student ability to create and to communicate with basic French structures and vocabulary. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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R1A, section 1: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Ut Pictura Poesis, Paris-New York: Trans-Atlantic exchanges between Poets and Painters, 1850 to the present.

M. Evans

In this course we’ll examine the poetic tradition often called ekphrasis (poetry about painting, loosely translated) as it informs the cultural exchanges between poets writing in America and Paris. French R1A fulfills the first half of the Reading and Composition Requirement in the College of Letters and Science. Class conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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R1A, section 2: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Flying Away

Singer

In this course we will look at how flying characters are lauded and condemned, as well as the narratives, language, and gender politics used to bestow these evaluative claims. French R1A fulfills the first half of the Reading and Composition Requirement in the College of Letters and Science. Class conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please click n course title.

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R1B, section 1: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- “This Could All Be Yours Someday” – Building the Nation Through Literature

M. Arrigo

This course will focus broadly on how literature shapes the “nation” and mediates our relationship to it. French R1B fulfills the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement in the College of Letters and Science. Class conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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R1B, section 2: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Laughter and Tricky Topics

C. Stofle

In this course, we will explore various theories of humor — from the baudelairian construct of laughter as evil to the freudian theory of relief — that will help us decipher and discuss ludic processes in literary texts, films, memes, and stand-up acts. French R1B fulfills the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement in the College of Letters and Science. Class conducted in ENGLISH. For more details, please click on course title.

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R1B, section 3: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Love in Perspective(s)

K. Levine

In this course, which builds upon the skills developed in R1A, we will read a variety of texts – ancient, medieval, and modern – that highlight questions of point of view and present different ideas of romantic love. French R1B fulfills the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement in the College of Letters and Science. Class conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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R1B, section 4: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Demand the Impossible! France in the 1960's

M. Koerner

In this course we will study some of the tumultuous events that occurred in France during the 1960s. Situating these events in relation to their broader, post-war, global context this course offers students an overview of one of the most transformative decades of the twentieth century. This course investigates the legacies of these movements as well as the historical and literary narratives that have since come to frame these events. French R1B fulfills the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement in the College of Letters and Science. Class conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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R1B, section 5: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- “… that power which eternally wills evil and eternally works good:” Evil and the Satanic from Prometheus to Camus.

S. Rogghe

In this course, we will look at different interpretations of “evil,” from the grotesquely Satanic to the mundanely banal. French R1B fulfills the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement in the College of Letters and Science. Class conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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2: Elementary French, second semester

S. Chavdarian in charge

Continuing development of students' awareness of Francophone cultures, knowledge of fundamental structures of French, and their appropriate socio-linguistic application in both spoken and written communication. Class conducted entirely in French. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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3: Intermediate French

V. Rodic in charge

This is an intermediate language and culture class that aims to consolidate and expand the skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing in French while introducing students to texts from the French and Francophone cultures. The course aims to promote cross-cultural understanding through the use of authentic materials such as literary works and journalistic texts, multimedia, film, pop songs, and television/radio broadcasts, and other cultural artifacts. Conducted in French. For a more detailed course description, please click on course title.

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4: Advanced Intermediate French

V. Rodic in charge

French 4 is an advanced intermediate language and culture class that aims to refine the skills acquired in French 3 or equivalent courses and to enhance students' familiarity with French and Francophone literature. Emphasis is placed on the strengthening of oral and written expression in order to promote linguistic and cultural competences through an extensive grammar review and exploration of texts, visual and audio sources, multi-media, and other cultural artifacts. Course conducted in French. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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14: Advanced Conversation

E. Alluyn-Fride

Listening, reading and discussion of French sociocultural realities including economics, politics, popular culture, and family life at the beginning of the 21st century. Oral presentations, debates, collaborative projects, regular journal entries and assignments. Class conducted entirely in French.

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35: Practical Phonetics and Listening Comprehension

E. Ritchey

This multimedia web-assisted course concentrates on pronunciation and listening comprehension skills. Because it concentrates on the first task confronted upon arrival in a French-speaking country (to understand and be understood), it has traditionally been considered very helpful before going to France for study, work, or travel. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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43B: Aspects of French Culture: Films of the French New Wave -- The Essentials

N. Paige

This course will introduce students to a number of classic films of the French New Wave, perhaps the most important and emblematic moment in modern cinema, and still a point of reference for filmmakers ranging from Quentin Tarantino and Martin Scorsese to Alfonso CuarĂłn and Wong Kar-Wai This course satisfies the College of Letters and Science breadth requirement in Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences. Course taught in English; knowledge of French not required. For more details, please click on course title.

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102: Writing in French, 2 sections

D. Blocker, M. McLaughlin

This course introduces students to different modes of proposing and furthering a point of view or argument (whether in a critical essay, through dramatic metaphor, or in plays or short stories). Great attention is paid, both through the readings and through extensive written work, to questions of interpretation as well as to the logical and coherent development of reading and writing skills leading to correct and effective expression in French. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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103B: Language and Culture -- Littérature, cinéma et colonialisme

S. Tlatli

Dans ce cours, nous analyserons la manière dont des penseurs, cinéastes et écrivains du vingtième siècle ont pris parti pour ou contre la formation d'un empire colonial français et de l'indépendance des pays colonisés. Les questions suivantes seront discutées: la fascination de l'exotisme, les guerres de décolonisation, la torture et l'état, la déshumanisation coloniale. For more details, please click on course title.

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118B: Eighteenth Century Literature -- The French Enlightenment and its Afterlife

S. Maslan

For Immanuel Kant at the end of the 18th century the "Enlightenment" was the time during which and the process by which human beings finally emerged from their own self-imposed childhood. The Enlightenment meant shaking off traditional authorities-- kings, priests, fathers—and refusing to acknowledge the legitimacy of handed-down ideas. More recently, For Horkheimer and Adorno, the "Enlightenment" was the origin of the kind of instrumental reason that led to fascism. More recent scholars accuse the Enlightenment of having constructed a “universal man” who is nothing but a cover for white, western, male power. Other critics of the Enlightenment complain that it made our society too secular and too licencious—that it dissolved the basis for morality itself. In this class we will try to decide for ourselves. We will revisit many of the classic works of the French eighteenth century, trying to take Kant’s injunction as our watchword as we seek to discover the relation between our own complicated societies and the legacy of the Enlightenment. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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126: Senior Seminar -- Victor Hugo: the poet as activist.

S. Guerlac

Victor Hugo’s life spanned almost the entire 19th century, a period of radical social transformation. He became a successful poet under the Restoration King at a very young age and then proceeded to transform French poetry and his own political and social ideas. In this seminar we will study Hugo’s literary works (prose, drama and poetry) in relation to his evolving social concerns and the changes underway in French culture. Senior standing recommended, but not required for enrollment. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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141: French Studies in an International Context -- France, Europe, and the Refugee “Crisis”: Explorations in Fiction and Film

D. Sanyal

This course investigates the itineraries and narratives of refugees today. Contemporary French fiction and film will help us reconstruct aspects of a refugee's flight and chart their perilous journey across land and sea into Europe. All reading, writing and discussion are in English. Fortnightly screenings of films will be scheduled. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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148: Translation Methodology and Practice

M. McLaughlin

This course brings together aspects of translation theory and translation methodology in order to develop our skills as translators. During the course we will translate both from French into English and from English into French, paying particular attention to the linguistic differences between the two languages that pose problems for translators. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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170: French Films -- Introduction to French Cinema

M. Sidhu

This class explores the rich history of French cinema in terms of larger issues in French culture, society, and politics. We will examine some of the major movements in French film style from poetic realism to the Nouvelle Vague. For more details, please click on course title.

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183A: Configurations of Crisis -- L’impact de la guerre d’Algérie dans la France contemporaine

S. Tlatli

Le but de ce cours est d’analyser les évènements historiques de la guerre d’Algérie (1954-1962) mais aussi ses conséquences dans la vie politique et culturelle contemporaine. Nous étudierons en détail, selon une perspective littéraire et historique, la manière dont la guerre d’Algérie a bouleversé le paysage politique français, mais aussi la manière dont elle a affecté les populations en Algérie et en France jusqu’à présent. For more details, please click on course title.

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Graduate

206: Special Topics in French Linguistics -- Second Language Acquisition: Concepts, Theories, and Debates

R. Kern

This course is an introduction to the broad and diverse body of research dealing with how children and adults learn a language other than than their mother tongue. It will deal with canonical (psycholinguistic and interactional) theories of second language acquisition as well as more recent sociocultural and ecological/emergentist theories. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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245B: Early Modern Studies -- Philology, Manuscript Studies and Book History Among The Disciplines (1300-2000)

D. Blocker

This seminar aims to collectively investigate the place of what we currently call “philological practices” in the development of humanistic studies in the Occidental world from 1400 to our contemporary moment. This seminar welcomes interested students from ALL the humanistic disciplines represented on campus — whether or not they are early modernists — while concurrently serving as the “methods and tools” seminar for the DE in REMS for Spring 2018 (http://rems.berkeley.edu). We will work collectively to generate a thoroughly interdisciplinary dialogue across humanistic disciplines, as well as across time periods. No foreign language skills are required to take this class. For more details, please click on course title.

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251: Francophone Literature -- Francophone Literature and the Shameful State

K. Britto

Alternative facts, kleptocratic regimes, vulgar authoritarians who claim to speak in the voice of the people—for generations, francophone authors have grappled with these and other aspects of postcolonial rule. In this seminar, we will read a number of literary texts that narrate uneasy passages from the colonial period through the era of independence and on into variously configured neocolonial states and totalitarian regimes. For more details, please click on course title.

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270A: Literary Criticism: Recent Work in French -- Nature/milieu/habit/life (course also accepted in DE in Critical Theory)

S. Guerlac

In this seminar, we will explore how notions of nature, milieu, habit and life “hang together” (or do not) as we travel through writings by philosophers, physiologists, psychologists and philosophers of science. Reading knowledge of French would be helpful but not essential, as most of our readings will be available in English translation. This course also accepted for 240 course requirement in DE in Critical Theory. For more details, please click on course title.

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Pedagogical

302: Teaching French in College: Advanced First Year

S. Chavdarian

Provides an understanding of the teaching methods used in French 2, to help instructors effectively implement techniques specifically designed for the French language classroom at Berkeley.

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303: Teaching French in College: Second Year

V. Rodic

Provides an understanding of the teaching methods used in French 3 and 4, to help instructors effectively implement techniques specifically designed for the French language classroom at Berkeley. French 303 provides a forum for discussing issues in language pedagogy, and experience in creating and adapting instructional materials and designing tests for use in the UC Berkeley French language program. Also provides training in webdesign and preparation for the job market. One two-hour meeting per week. For additional course information, please select course title.

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