Courses available in French

Courses

Le voyage n’est nĂ©cessaire qu’aux imaginations courtes.

— Colette

2017 Summer

Graduate | Pedagogical

Undergraduate

1: Elementary French, first semester (Summer Session C -- 8 weeks)

S. Chavdarian in charge

This course is conducted entirely in French. Introduction to Francophone cultures through speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French, with French as the exclusive means of communication. No previous French experience required. This course is also appropriate for students with one quarter of college-level French, 2 years of high school French, or less. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

R1B, section 1: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Dissidence and Subversion (Summer Session D -- 6 weeks)

S. Postoli

In this course we will consider literary and cinematographic works from the XVIII century to the present that position themselves antagonistically vis-à-vis a form of government, ideology, or historical event. Our discussions will explore how these texts are situated in the historical context and, more importantly, what they react against, what they attempt to overcome, and by what means — stylistic, generic, discursive, philosophical, aesthetic, or otherwise. French R1B fulfills the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement in the College of Letters and Science. Class conducted in ENGLISH.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

R1B, section 2: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Ex Machina: Machines and Humans in French Literature and Film (Summer Session D -- 6 weeks)

J. Vaknin

Equally a source of wonder and dread, the figure of the automaton has been a rich trope in literature and art for centuries. Moving more or less chronologically from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries, we’ll turn to examples—mostly in French and francophone literature and film—that deal with automation and robotics. Our discussions will be guided by the following questions, among others: How does art represent the interaction between machines and humans? What function does the figure of the robot perform in literature and film? How does technology raise new questions concerning race, gender, sexuality, and socioeconomic class? French R1B fulfills the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement in the College of Letters and Science. Class conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

2: Elementary French, second semester (Summer Session C -- 8 weeks)

S. Chavdarian in charge

Class conducted entirely in French. Continuing development of students' knowledge of fundamental structures of French, awareness of Francophone cultures, and their appropriate socio-linguistic application in both spoken and written communication. Required: French 1 at UC Berkeley or 1 semester (or 2 quarters) of college-level French at another university or 3 years of high school French or consent of the instructor. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

3: Intermediate French (Summer Session C - 8 weeks)

V. Rodic in charge

This is an intermediate language and culture class that aims to consolidate and expand the skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing in French. This course is conducted in French. Required: one of the following -- 4 years of high school French; a passing grade in French 2 at UC Berkeley; 2nd or 3rd semester college French; 3rd or 4th-quarter college French; a 3 on the AP French exam. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

4: Advanced Intermediate French (Summer Session C -- 8 weeks)

V. Rodic in charge

French 4 is an advanced intermediate language and culture class that aims to refine the skills acquired in French 3 or equivalent courses and to introduce students to French and francophone literature. Emphasis is placed on the development of oral and written expression to promote linguistic and cultural competences through an extensive grammar review and exploration of spoken and written texts, as well as film, multi-media, and other cultural artifacts. Course conducted in French. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

145: History of the French Language (Summer Session D -- 6 weeks)

K. Levine

Where did French, and its idiosyncratic spelling rules and infamous grammar exceptions, come from? How might its history continue to influence French as it is spoken, written, and taught today? Through readings of historical texts from a variety of genres, student presentations, and in-class discussions, we will consider what it means for a language to change and be changed. (Experience in linguistics not required.) Course and readings in French. For more detailed description, click on course title.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

Graduate

201: History of the French Language

M. McLaughlin

Where did French, and its idiosyncratic spelling rules and infamous grammar exceptions, come from? How might its history continue to influence French as it is spoken, written, and taught today? Through readings of historical texts from a variety of genres, student presentations, and in-class discussions, we will consider what it means for a language to change and be changed. (Experience in linguistics not required.) Course taught in French. For a more detailed description, please click on the course title.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

Pedagogical