Courses available in French

Courses

Le voyage n’est nĂ©cessaire qu’aux imaginations courtes.

— Colette

2016 Spring

Graduate | Pedagogical

Undergraduate

1 : Elementary French, first semester

S. Chavdarian in Charge

Introduction to Francophone cultures through speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French, with French as the exclusive means of communication. Emphasis is placed on developing student ability to create and to communicate with basic French structures and vocabulary. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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R1A, section 1: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Interlocution --The Act of Talking In and Through Literature

S. Postoli

Looking at the varying methods and degrees to which talking is employed by authors across different periods, we will see how it informs or defines a particular genre or style; how it functions within it; as well as how interlocution can become problematic in instances where communication is abused, subverted, or rendered impossible. French R1A satisfies the first half of the Reading and Composition Requirement. Classes are conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please select course title.

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R1A, section 2: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- "True" Stories, Opinionated Narrators, and Other Complications-- Approaches to Narrative Form

K. Levine

In this course, we will read a variety of fictional texts in order to explore the ways in which stories can be told. Our starting point will be the whys and hows of writing and reading: why would an author decide to withhold information from the reader? How does a reader perceive a first-person narrator vs. a third-person one? As we look at how authors choose to convey their stories and how those choices affect our understanding of their narratives, we will also consider strategies for presenting our own arguments about literature. French R1A satisfies the first half of the Reading and Composition Requirement. Classes are conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please select course title.

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R1B, section 1 or 2: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- France And The U.S.A. -- Cross Cultural Encounters In Literature And Film

M. Koerner

This reading and composition course focuses on the relationship between French and American culture – and the way each country has been perceived by the other – through a survey of writers and filmmakers who have made this relationship a central theme of their work. French R1B satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement. Classes are conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please select course title.

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R1B, section 3: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Here Be Dragons -- Early Modernity and the Known World

L. Louie

According to popular belief, medieval mapmakers marked unknown territory with the speculative phrase, “Here Be Dragons.” The term “Early Modern” (which usually designates the period after the Middle Ages and before the Enlightenment) might suggest to us that the people of this period were moving away from a medieval understanding of the unknown world as populated by dragons, and moving toward objectively greater geographic, anthropological, and cosmological understanding. However, in this class we will think about how this period, often viewed as a time of discovery, was also a time when different parts of France remained foreign to each other, while differences of religion, language, and gender took on new significance. We will think about how these internal divisions inform medieval and Renaissance literary accounts of novelty and foreignness, from the New World all the way to the moon. In what ways might our present-day understanding of the world be understood as pre-modern? French R1B satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement. Classes are conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please select course title.

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2 : Elementary French, second semester

S. Chavdarian in Charge

Continuing development of students' awareness of Francophone cultures, knowledge of fundamental structures of French, and their appropriate socio-linguistic application in both spoken and written communication. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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3: Intermediate French

V. Rodic in charge

This is an intermediate language and culture class that aims to consolidate and expand the skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing in French. The course aims to promote cross-cultural understanding through the use of authentic materials such as literary and journalistic texts, multimedia, film, pop songs, and television/radio broadcasts, and other cultural artifacts. addition to a review and refinement of grammar and vocabulary in a culturally rich context, students also experiment with their written expression through different formats, including analytical essays, journals, creative writing and independent projects using the Internet. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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4: Advanced Intermediate French

V. Rodic in charge

French 4 is an advanced intermediate language and culture class that aims to refine the skills acquired in French 3 or equivalent courses and to introduce students to French and francophone literature. Emphasis is placed on the development of oral and written expression to promote linguistic and cultural competences through an extensive grammar review and exploration of spoken and written texts, as well as film, multi-media, and other cultural artifacts. We will read short stories, plays, poems and discuss their literary and cultural contexts (music, art, history, philosophy). Throughout the semester, students will share ideas in collaborative, small-group and whole class discussion, explore new formats for expository prose, continue journalistic and creative writing activities in French, and work on independent projects using the Internet. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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13 : Intermediate Conversation

R. Kern in charge

This course develops students’ ability to speak and understand French in both conversational and formal contexts, enlarges vocabulary, and enhances familiarity with contemporary French culture. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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14: Advanced Conversation

R. Kern in charge

Listening, reading and discussion of French sociocultural realities including economics, politics, popular culture, and family life at the beginning of the 21st century. Oral presentations, debates, collaborative projects, regular journal entries and assignments. Class conducted entirely in French. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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35: Practical Phonetics and Listening Comprehension

N. Timmons

This multimedia web-assisted course concentrates on pronunciation and listening comprehension skills. Because it concentrates on the first task confronted upon arrival in a French-speaking country (to understand and be understood), it has traditionally been considered very helpful before going to France for study, work, or travel. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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102: Writing in French, 3 sections

S. Maslan, R. Shuh or M. McLaughlin

This course introduces students to different modes of proposing and furthering a point of view or argument (whether in a critical essay, through dramatic metaphor, or in plays or short stories). Great attention is paid, both through the readings and through extensive written work, to questions of interpretation as well as to the logical and coherent development of reading and writing skills leading to correct and effective expression in French. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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103B: Language and Culture -- Histoires de jardins -- Le jardin dans l’imaginaire littĂ©raire français et francophone

R. Shuh

Lieu d’origine, de pouvoir, d’évasion; espace de rencontre, d’amour et de subversion, souvent pensĂ© au fĂ©minin, le jardin est saturĂ© de sens depuis ses origines judĂ©o-chrĂ©tiennes. Nous nous proposons de suivre les dĂ©tours de ce motif Ă  travers plusieurs Ă©poques de la littĂ©rature française et francophone. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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114A: Late Medieval Literature -- Love, Humor and Satire in an Age of War and Plague

D. Hult

The Black Plague, the Hundred Years’ War, serve as the gruesome backdrop for one of the richest periods of creation in the aristocratic tradition of courtly poetry and romance, extending from the mid-fourteenth to the late fifteenth century. Were the light and frivolous fictions of love and seduction merely an escapist fantasy, a way of thinking of things other than death and disease, or is there a darker side to these fictions? For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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121B: Literary Themes, Genres, Structures - Short Forms and Very Short Forms

S. Guerlac

Increasingly writers are exploring short forms – sometimes Very short forms. There have been many inspirations for this: romantic esthetics of the fragment, the phenomenon of the post card, avant -garde contestations of conventional art practices and markets, 20th esthetic traditions of minimalism, an esthetics of the everyday, the impact of media such as photography, tv (channel surfing and interruption by ads) and especially the internet (twitter) as well as the generally precarious state of the world. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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138: French for Teaching and Related Careers

R. Kern

This course will introduce students to the field of second language acquisition, considering specific issues in learning and teaching French. We will study models of second language acquisition, as well as a variety of approaches to the teaching of French as a foreign language. Students will learn how to observe and analyze teaching and will get practice in preparing and teaching a micro-lesson. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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148: Translation Methodology and Practice

M. McLaughlin

This course brings together aspects of translation theory and translation methodology in order to develop our skills as translators. During the course we will translate both from French into English and from English into French, paying particular attention to the linguistic differences between the two languages that pose problems for translators. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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172A: Psychoanalysis and Literature

S. Tlatli

Le but de ce cours est d’explorer la naissance et le dĂ©veloppement de la psychanalyse, ainsi que l’évolution de l’hypnose, depuis le dix-huitiĂšme siĂšcle jusqu’à la pĂ©riode contemporaine. Son objectif est triple: il est premiĂšrement, historique; il s'agit de dĂ©couvrir la naissance et le dĂ©veloppement de la psychanalyse dans le contexte de la psychiatrie française du dix-neuviĂšme siĂšcle influencĂ©e par Charcot. Il est deuxiĂšmement, thĂ©orique: ce cours permettra de comprendre les principaux concepts de la psychanalyse et de la psychiatrie. Enfin, il est littĂ©raire: il s'agira d'Ă©tudier, Ă  travers une Ă©tude du mouvement surrĂ©aliste et de contes fantastiques, tels que ceux de Maupassant et Edgar Allen Poe, l’influence de la psychanalyse sur la literature.

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174: Music and Literature

D. Moroney

This course examines various ways in which French composers have set the French language to music, with specific attention to the unique musical solutions they came up with. Topics covered include: classical vers mesurĂ©s; French responses to Protestant metrical psalmody; sixteenth- and seventeenth-century airs de cour; the development of French opera in the reign of Louis XIV; the emergence of women song composers in Paris (1650-1730) and the question of how these songs articulate a different artistic voice from songs written by men; French resistance to Italian dominance in musical styles in the early eighteenth century, leading to François Couperin's Les GoĂ»ts-RĂ©ĂŒnis (1724). For a more detailed description, please select course title.

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177B: History and Criticism of Film -- Sex, Gender, and Desire in French Cinema

D. Young

This course approaches French cinema through the lens of three of its perennial themes: sex, gender, and desire. We will consider how what film theorist Laura Mulvey calls the “male gaze” has traditionally shaped cinema aesthetics in France, and then look at how films by women and/or queer film-makers have in recent decades challenged sexual and gendered norms. For a more detailed course description, please click on course title.

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178A: Studies in French Film -- Pourquoi Godard?!

U. Dutoit

Parcours avec, chez, Jean-Luc Godard (Anne-Marie Mieville) de sauve qui peut (la vie)1980 Ă  Adieu au Langage 2013. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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180B: French Civilization -- "Les animots": The Culture of the Creature in Early Modern France

N. Durling

In this course we will study the ways in which the depiction of animals changes over time, first reading a selection of foundational texts from antiquity and tracing their influence in medieval literature, then examining the sometimes alarming (tricksters, hybrids, scapegoats), often alluring (companions, spiritual guides) depiction of animals in early modern French culture. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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Graduate

210A: Studies in Medieval Literature -- The Romance of the Rose and the Tradition of Medieval Allegory

D. Hult

This course will combine a detailed reading of the Roman de la Rose and its critical heritage with a study of the medieval tradition of allegorical writing. Annex texts will include those written by some of the great predecessors of Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meun, including selections from Saint Augustine, Macrobius, Boethius and Alain de Lille. For a more detailed course description, please click on course title.

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220A: Studies in 16th-Century Literature -- Rabelais and his Friends -- Humanism, the Humanities, and the Fate of Reading

T. Hampton

This seminar will offer an extended engagement with the work of the greatest writer of prose narrative in the European Renaissance, François Rabelais. Through a reading of the work of Rabelais and several of his humanist contemporaries (Erasmus, Marot, Dolet, Marguerite de Navarre) we will pay special attention to the changing strategies of reading and interpretation that shape the genesis of modern "literature" in the sixteenth century. For a more detailed course description, please click on course title.

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240A: Studies in 18th Century French Literature -- Diderot and Rousseau

S. Maslan

This seminar will be an immersion in the writings of two central thinkers of modernity: Denis Diderot and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. We will study the ways in which they rethought the foundations of social life, of subjectivity, of politics, of painting, of theater, and of language. We will seek to understand both the artistic and political radicalness of their ambitions. We will consider the ways in which these two iconic figures—their friendship and their rupture—came to figure at once the Enlightenment and the counter-Enlightenment. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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251: Francophone Literature -- La littĂ©rature francophone et ‘le droit Ă  la mort’

S. Tlatli

Dans ce sĂ©minaire, nous interrogerons la relation entre la psychanalyse, l’écriture de l’histoire et la littĂ©rature post-coloniale. Nous nous intĂ©resserons en particulier au lien entre la pulsion de mort Ă©laborĂ©e par Freud et sa relation avec la littĂ©rature, et l’écriture de l’histoire dans le roman francophone. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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260B: Studies in 20th-Century Literature -- What is the (literary) history of sexuality?

M. Lucey

If “What is the history of sexuality?” will be one of the central questions we will be asking throughout the semester, two others will be “How does literature figure in the history of sexuality?” and “What other kinds of history are part of the history of sexuality, or what other histories is the history of sexuality part of?” Our primary texts will be French and francophone literary texts from about 1990 to the present. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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Pedagogical

302: Teaching French in College – Advanced First Year

S. Chavdarian

Provides an understanding of the teaching methods used in French 2, to help instructors effectively implement techniques specifically designed for the French language classroom at Berkeley. This course provides a forum for discussing issues in language pedagogy, and experience in creating and adapting instructional materials and designing tests for use in the UC Berkeley French language program. GSIs are also required to attend a pilot class, taught by Seda Chavdarian, on select dates and as indicated on the lesson plans. For additional course information, please select course title.

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303: Teaching in French, Advanced Level

V. Rodic

Provides an understanding of the teaching methods used in French 3 and 4, to help instructors effectively implement techniques specifically designed for the French language classroom at Berkeley. French 303 provides a forum for discussing issues in language pedagogy, and experience in creating and adapting instructional materials and designing tests for use in the UC Berkeley French language program. For additional course information, please select course title.

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