Courses available in French

Courses

Enivrez-vous.

— Baudelaire

2015 Fall

Graduate | Pedagogical

Undergraduate

1: Elementary French, first semester

Seda Chavdarian in charge

Introduction to Francophone cultures through speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French, with French as the exclusive means of communication. Emphasis is placed on developing student ability to create and to communicate with basic French structures and vocabulary. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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R1A, section 1: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Marginal Perspectives

J. Singer

In this course we will read about people living on the margins of themselves and their world. We will consider how marginal status is constructed within a text and how a marginal point of view shapes a narrative. French R1A satisfies the first half of the Reading and Composition Requirement. Classes are conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please click on the course title.

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R1A, section 2: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Guests, Visitors, and Other Nuisances

E. Ritchey

In this course we will read, analyze, and discuss works that feature the arrival of a guest or visitor as a driver of plot and characterization. These readings and discussions will feed into the composition of several analytical papers over the course of the semester, along with other writing exercises designed to develop critical thinking, composition, editing, and presentation skills. French R1A satisfies the first half of the Reading and Composition Requirement. Classes are conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please click on the course title.

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R1A, section 3: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- From Solitary Strolls to Silly Walks: Walking and Modernity in France and Elsewhere

M. Evans

How does the way we walk and the way we think about walking frame and reflect the way we humans define ourselves? How do the walks we go on and the walking we do evolve over time and space, between cultures, between genders, between perceived categories of abilities and disabilities? This course will take up these questions as we look at the way in which walking has been thematized or sometimes just sneaks into some important moments in the history of French literature. French R1A satisfies the first half of the Reading and Composition Requirement. Classes are conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please click on the course title.

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R1B, sections 1 and 2: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Demand the Impossible! France in the 1960's

M. Koerner

In this course we will study some of the tumultuous events that occurred in France during the 1960s, including the massive student occupation of universities and the largest labor strike in French history in May ‘68. In challenging traditional social norms and existing forms of authority and representation, young people across the globe were calling the society they inherited into question. Through novels, philosophical texts, manifestos, films and poetry, this course investigates the legacies of these movements as well as the historical narratives that have since come to frame these events. French R1B satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement. Classes are conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed course description, please click on the course title.

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2: Elementary French, second semester

Seda Chavdarian in charge

Continuing development of students' awareness of Francophone cultures, knowledge of fundamental structures of French, and their appropriate socio-linguistic application in both spoken and written communication. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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3: Intermediate French

V. Rodic in charge

This is an intermediate language and culture class that aims to consolidate and expand the skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing in French. The course aims to promote cross-cultural understanding through the use of authentic materials such as literary and journalistic texts, multimedia, film, pop songs, and television/radio broadcasts, and other cultural artifacts. addition to a review and refinement of grammar and vocabulary in a culturally rich context, students also experiment with their written expression through different formats, including analytical essays, journals, creative writing and independent projects using the Internet. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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13: Intermediate Conversation

Rick Kern in charge

This course develops students’ ability to speak and understand French in both conversational and formal contexts, enlarges vocabulary, and enhances familiarity with contemporary French culture. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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102: Writing in French, 3 sections

S. Chavdarian, N. Paige, R. Shuh

This course introduces students to different modes of proposing and furthering a point of view or argument (whether in a critical essay, through dramatic metaphor, or in plays or short stories). Great attention is paid, both through the readings and through extensive written work, to questions of interpretation as well as to the logical and coherent development of reading and writing skills leading to correct and effective expression in French. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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103A: Language and Culture -- Le Portrait de l’artiste

R. Shuh

Du peintre à la cantatrice, du musicien au poète, comment met-on en scène la figure de l’artiste? En lisant un choix de textes, nous nous demanderons ce que la représentation du créateur nous dit sur la conception de l’art dans des époques différentes, sur les rapports entre l’art et la vie, sur les moyens d’expression et sur les possibilités mêmes de la représentation. Nos textes se regrouperont surtout au XIXe siècle, moment critique où l’artiste change de statut dans la société post-révolutionnaire. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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112A: Medieval French Literature

D. Hult

The subject of this course is the most creative period of medieval literature, in which the epic still flourished but courtliness and the romance were born. Most of the texts will be read in modern French, but instruction in the Old French language will be an important component of the class and key passages will be read in their original linguistic form. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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118B: Eighteenth Century Literature -- The French Enlightenment and its Afterlife

S. Maslan

Recent, tragic events in France have put the French Enlightenment front and center in national and international debates. Once again Voltaire has become a bestseller as people in France try to come to grips with issues that define national and cultural identity and even modernity itself. The cartoons in Charlie Hebdo, the murderous attacks on the artists and writers, the massive reaction the attacks provoked, all of these send us back looking for answers to questions first publicly debated in the eighteenth century, questions like what is freedom of expression? What is, or should be, the relation between religion and the State? What do secularism or freedom of religion really mean? What do we mean when we talk about freedom and equality? “Dare to know” was the watchword Kant retrospectively assigned to the readers and writers of the Enlightenment. For a more detailed description, please click on the course title.

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120A: Twentieth-Century Literature -- Literary Manifestos of the 20th and 21st Centuries

E. Colon

Dans ce cours, nous retracerons une histoire de la littérature française et francophone, des années 1920 à nos jours, à partir d’un type de texte particulier, le manifeste, par lesquel certains des mouvements littéraires du vingtième siècle se sont définis. L’ objectif de ce cours est de vous introduire aux mouvements littéraires et politiques majeurs des 20ème et 21ème siècles, tout en vous amenant à réfléchir à la manifestation littéraire, c’est-à-dire à la nécessité de rendre explicites les relations entre les formes littéraires et les projets esthétiques et/ou politiques qui les travaillent. For a more detailed course description, please click on course title.

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142AC: The Cultures of Franco-America

K. Britto

In this course, we will consider a broad range of literary and cultural texts that emerge out of the long history of the French in North America and of Americans in France. Our readings will include novels, poetry, and short stories—including the earliest known work of African American fiction, written in French and published in Paris in 1837. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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146A: Introduction to French Linguistics

M. McLaughlin

This course provides an introduction to the linguistic analysis of Modern French. Students will develop the basic skills of linguistic analysis in order to understand how the French language works. We consider four different levels: the phonology (sounds), the morphology (internal structure of words), the syntax (ordering of elements within the phrase) and the lexis (vocabulary). For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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150A: Women in French Literature -- Women and Writing in France, 1500-1800

S. Maslan

“Dans ses meubles, dût-elle en avoir l’ennui,/Il ne faut écritoire, encre, papier, ni plume./ Le mari doit dans les bonnes coutumes, écrire tout ce qui s’écrit chez lui.” Molière, L’École des femmes This course will explore the relation between women and writing from the sixteenth through the end of the eighteenth centuries in France. We will seek to understand what writing meant to women: how it helped them form their own identities, explore and construct the self, and to participate beyond the domestic sphere. And we will study how the broader culture thought about women and writing. For more detailed description, please click on course title.

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151A: Francophone Literature -- Francophone Africa

S. Tlatli

In this class we will examine the political as well as the literary connotations of francophonie. We will historically contextualize this notion by retracing the story of the French colonization and Africa struggle for decolonization. We will then discuss a series of literary works by authors such as Senghor, Glissant, Césaire, Djebar, and Sembène. An important part of this course will be devoted to the relationship between films and literary works in the depiction of a Francophone Africa. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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162B: Perspectives on History -- Islam in Contemporary France: are we all “Charlie”?

S. Tlatli

This course is shaped by the tragic events that recently took place in France. On January 7, 2015 a terrorist attack on the satirical paper “Charlie Hebdo” left twelve people dead. It was followed, two days later, by an attack on a kosher supermarket that left four Jewish people dead. In reaction to this bloodshed more than a million people marched in the streets of Paris as a show of unity, claiming “Je suis Charlie”. We will first retrace these events in their historical context. We will then examine the complex situation of Islam in contemporary France as well as questions such as: freedom of speech, satire and secularism. We will also focus on the question of political Islam as instrumentalized by both the French government and fundamentalist groups. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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Graduate

211A: Reading and Interpretation of Old French Texts

D. Hult

Introduction to the study of medieval French language and literature of the 12th and 13th centuries. Through a careful analysis and critical interpretation of certain canonical works (La Chanson de Roland; Béroul and Thomas, Tristan; selected lais of Marie de France; selected romans of Chrétien de Troyes; Le Roman de la Rose) we will study Old French language and some main dialects; verse and prose composition; theories of the oral tradition; editorial problems; and the material aspects of the manuscript work (including some work on codicology and paleography). For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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245B: Early Modern Studies -- The Epistolary Novel: From the Canon to the Archive

N. Paige

This seminar has two aims. Mostly, we’ll be studying a series of five canonically important representatives of the genre of the epistolary novel, and acquainting ourselves with a variety of scholarly attempts to “motivate the device” of letters: it’s a form that has long been linked to the culture of sociability, to sentiment and sensibilité, to the advent of the private sphere, and even, recently, to the growth of the postal service itself. But we’ll also save part of the semester for thinking about how to approach the history of a form from below—that is, by developing ways of studying the whole archive of epistolary novels, the ones that, to use Franco Moretti’s image, never survived literature’s “slaughterhouse.” For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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250B: Studies in Nineteenth-Century French Literature -- Photographic Practices and Literary Seeing in 19th C. France

S. Guerlac

Many argue that the emergence of photography in the 19th century produced entirely new modes of seeing. We will consider various modalities of photographic image capture in the 19th century and their impact on the literary field, leading up to Breton’s definition of Surrealism, in the early 20th century, as a “photographie de la pensée.” For a more detailed description, please click on the course title.

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270A: Literary Criticism -- Recent Work in French -- Théories et pratiques littéraires du mondial (1990-présent)

E. Colon

Dans ce séminaire, qui aura lieu en français, nous étudierons trois types de textes dans les relations qu’ils déploient avec la mondialisation et/ou la globalisation: des romans et récits publiés depuis la fin des années 1990, des manifestes d’écrivains, et des ouvrages critiques et théoriques majeurs de ces dernières années. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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Pedagogical

301: Teaching French in College: First Year

S. Chavdarian

This course (1) provides participants with an understanding of basic principles of first- and second-language acquisition and the theoretical underpinnings of commonly used language teaching methods, and (2) offers inservice training in teaching, in creating and adapting instructional materials, and in designing tests for use in the Lower Division Program in French. For a more detailed description, please click on title.

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