Courses available in French

Courses

La poĂ©tique de la durĂ©e s’efforce d’apaiser l’hier fiĂ©vreux, de tramer ce lointain devenir.

— Glissant

2014 Fall

Graduate | Pedagogical

Undergraduate

1: Elementary French, first semester

Seda Chavdarian in Charge

Introduction to Francophone cultures through speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French, with French as the exclusive means of communication. Emphasis is placed on developing student ability to create and to communicate with basic French structures and vocabulary. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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R1A, section 1: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Paradise Lost or Apocalypse now? -- French Utopian and Science Fiction

A. Gabel

In this course, we will look at a wide array of French texts or films fall under these umbrella labels of "science fiction" and "utopianism." We will situate these texts within the concerns of their particular historical context(s) and look at what kind of world they offer: paradise or apocalypse? French R1A satisfies the first half of the Reading and Composition Requirement. Classes are conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please click on the course title.

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R1A, sections 2 & 3: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Demand the Impossible! France in the 1960's

M. Koerner

In this course we will study the tumultous events in France of the late 1960's that culminated in May ’68 with the student occupation of universities and the largest labor strike in French history. As this year marks the 50th anniversary of the Free Speech Movement at Berkeley, we will also explore how the “right to speak” and the desire for liberated forms of expression connected students in France to similar movements among students in the U.S. as well as those in Prague, Berlin and Mexico City. This course investigates the legacies of these movements in reimagining the terms of politics and democracy, and how they redefined the limits of the possible. French R1A satisfies the first half of the Reading and Composition Requirement. Classes are conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed course description, please click on the course title.

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R1B, section 1: English Composition through French Literature in Translation — Love, etc.

C. Talley

In this course we’ll be interested in what various loves in the Romantic tradition are about, in addition to “love itself.” We’ll explore how amorous desire is influence by both memory and the imagination, and look for ways that certain states of mind like expectance and curiosity create conditions that allow love to emerge. French R1B satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement. Classes are conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please click on the course title.

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R1B, section 2: English Composition through French Literature in Translation — Urban Change in Modern France

M. Smith

The subject of this class is urban change. Our primary historical model will be the modernization of Paris in the 19th century. In particular, we will ask how cultural works from this period register, resist or reimagine social change. French R1B satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement. Classes are conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please click on the course title.

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R1B, section 3: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Clothes Lines: Fashion, Garments and Fabrics in Paris and Beyond

T. Wilds

“Clothes are the expression of society,” Honoré de Balzac -- In this course we will put Balzac’s maxim to the test, asking what exactly clothes tell us about the people who wear them and the places and times in which they are worn. In addition to looking at textiles as texts and reading texts on textiles, we will spend a portion of the semester examining texts as textiles. French R1B satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement. Classes are conducted in ENGLISH. For a more detailed description, please click on the course title.

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2: Elementary French, second semester

Seda Chavdarian in Charge

Continuing development of students' awareness of Francophone cultures, knowledge of fundamental structures of French, and their appropriate socio-linguistic application in both spoken and written communication. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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3: Intermediate French

Desirée Pries in Charge

This is an intermediate language and culture class that aims to consolidate and expand the skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing in French. The course aims to promote cross-cultural understanding through the use of authentic materials such as literary and journalistic texts, multimedia, film, pop songs, and television/radio broadcasts, and other cultural artifacts. addition to a review and refinement of grammar and vocabulary in a culturally rich context, students also experiment with their written expression through different formats, including analytical essays, journals, creative writing and independent projects using the Internet. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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4: Advanced Intermediate French

Desirée Pries in Charge

French 4 is an advanced intermediate language and culture class that aims to refine the skills acquired in French 3 or equivalent courses and to introduce students to French and francophone literature. Emphasis is placed on the development of oral and written expression to promote linguistic and cultural competences through an extensive grammar review and exploration of spoken and written texts, as well as film, multi-media, and other cultural artifacts. We will read short stories, plays, poems and discuss their literary and cultural contexts (music, art, history, philosophy). Throughout the semester, students will share ideas in collaborative, small-group and whole class discussion, explore new formats for expository prose, continue journalistic and creative writing activities in French, and work on independent projects using the Internet. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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13: Intermediate Conversation

R. Kern in charge

This course develops students’ ability to speak and understand French in both conversational and formal contexts, enlarges vocabulary, and enhances familiarity with contemporary French culture. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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102: Writing in French, 3 sections ("W")

M. McLaughlin, R. Shuh

This course introduces students to different modes of proposing and furthering a point of view or argument (whether in a critical essay, through dramatic metaphor, or in plays or short stories). Great attention is paid, both through the readings and through extensive written work, to questions of interpretation as well as to the logical and coherent development of reading and writing skills leading to correct and effective expression in French. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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103A: Language and Culture -- Fictions of Love ("W")

S. Guerlac

Who can we love? Who can we marry? Does love drive us crazy? Does love threaten our independence? Is love an individual or a social phenomenon? Does social class matter? Where is the right place to be in love (or at least to describe it)? We will examine various treatments of the theme of love from the Middle Ages to the 20th c. , reading works in various genres, including poetry, prose (realist tales and fantastic tales) and the theatre. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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112B: Medieval Literature -- Continuity and Change in Thirteenth-Century French Literature

D. Hult

This course provides an introduction to medieval French literature, starting with some of the most important courtly works of the late twelfth century and tracing their adapations in selected major works of the thirteenth century. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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117A: Seventeenth-Century Literature -- Inventing Modern Comedy -- Molière and his Time ("W")

D. Blocker

Molière was France’s most prominent comical actor, playwright and stage director during the Classical Age and his plays remain central to the French imaginary to this day. This class provides an introduction to Molière’s works and times. This course is designated as “W” (writing intensive -- specific emphasis on grammar and composition skills) in the French major. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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120B: Twentieth-Century Literature -- Wars, Revolts, Literature. Midnight in the Twentieth Century

E. Colon

In this course, we will explore the (plural and not always direct) relationships between literary creation and socio-political contexts as these relationships unfold in France between WWII and the contemporary era. We will do so through the lens of a publishing house, “Les Éditions de Minuit,” which was founded clandestinely during the Occupation and has since then hosted the publications of many major (as well as lesser known) writers and intellectuals. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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146A: Introduction to French Linguistics

R. Kern

This course provides an introduction to the linguistic analysis of Modern French. Students will develop the basic skills of linguistic analysis in order to understand how the French language works. We consider four different levels: the phonology (sounds), the morphology (internal structure of words), the syntax (ordering of elements within the phrase) and the lexis (vocabulary). For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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162A: Perspectives on History -- Histoire et mémoires de l'Occupation

D. Sanyal

An inquiry into the history and memory of wartime France through a range of cultural production: novels, essays, poetry, theatre and cinema. We will focus on representations of the Occupation; the literature of Resistance; art under Nazi censorship; Vichy France and collaboration; war and the colonies; antisemitism and the Holocaust. Our explorations will seek to understand why France continues to be haunted by this “past that refuses to pass.”

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172A: Psychoanalysis and Literature

S. Tlatli

Dans ce cours nous suivrons deux grandes voies, une orientation traditionnelle, soit la manière dont la théorie psychanalytique est appliquée au texte litteraire. Mais aussi, une voie historiquement et culturellement plus provoquante : comment les oeuvres littéraires et poétiques ont influencé la formation de la psychanalyse et de la psychiatrie. For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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175A: Literature and the Visual Arts -- Exploring the banlieues ("R")

E. Colon

In this course, we will organize a dialogue (sometimes a confrontational one) between literature and the visual arts by studying these media’s respective attempts to represent a specific, marginal space—the Parisian banlieues—as well as their working class, immigrant population. For a more detailed description, please click on title.

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183B: Configurations of Crisis -- la guerre de libération en Algérie (1954-1962)

S. Tlatli

Dans ce cours nous analyserons les faits importants qui ont marqué la guerre de libération en Algérie (1954-1962). Nous discuterons de l’importance politique de cette crise unique dans l’histoire du vingtième siècle français selon une double perspective : historique et littéraire. (For a more detailed description, please click on course title)

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Graduate

C202: Linguistic History of the Romance Languages

M. McLaughlin

This course traces the development of the Romance language family from its origins in Latin through to contemporary varieties. The course also places considerable emphasis on the external history of the languages and varieties that make up the Romance family. For a more detailed description, please click on title.

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211A: Reading and Interpretation of Old French Texts

D. Hult

Introduction to the study of medieval French language and literature of the 12th and 13th centuries. For a more detailed course description, please click on title.

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250A: Studies in 19th Century French Literature -- Victor Hugo, Before and After

S. Guerlac

We will consider the ways in which Victor Hugo (1802-1885) invites us to reconsider our conceptions of romanticism and modernism through his work in various genres and media that span the century (from the Restoration to the Third Republic). For a more detailed description, please click on course title.

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260A: Studies in 20th-Century Literature -- Noeuds de mémoire: Trauma and Transcultural Memory

D. Sanyal

This seminar examines representations of “knots of memory “ from postwar France to contemporary French and Francophone cultural production (narrative, film and theory). Our seminar will read a selection of literary and cinematic representations of entangled histories and legacies of trauma from the postwar context to today. For a more detailed description, please click on title.

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Pedagogical

301: Teaching French in College: First Year

S. Chavdarian

This course (1) provides participants with an understanding of basic principles of first- and second-language acquisition and the theoretical underpinnings of commonly used language teaching methods, and (2) offers inservice training in teaching, in creating and adapting instructional materials, and in designing tests for use in the Lower Division Program in French. For a more detailed description, please click on title.

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