Courses available in French

Courses

Mon utlime prière: Ô mon corps, fais de moi toujours un homme qui interroge!

— Fanon

2013 Spring

Graduate | Pedagogical

Undergraduate

1: Elementary French, first semester

Seda Chavdarian in Charge

Introduction to Francophone cultures through speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French, with French as the exclusive means of communication. Emphasis is placed on developing student ability to create and to communicate with basic French structures and vocabulary.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

R1A, section 1: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Radical Practices and Social Critique in Contemporary Poetry

Matthew Smith

This course will look at the ways in which recent experimental poetry reflects and responds to a wide range of social issues, from those concerning consumer culture to those of surveillance and control. Short experimental films and music with also be assigned and discussed in class.

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R1B section 1: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Food for Thought -- Feast and Famine in French Literature

Pamela Diaz

In this course, we will focus on the notion of food as a critical lens through which to read a variety of texts. The salient themes will include hunger and thirst as bodily concerns, the imagery of feasting, the danger of being devoured, the desire to devour, and the idea of nourishment in both the physical and spiritual senses. Reading assignments will have three major components: primary readings will mostly come from medieval and early modern texts and contexts. We will also spend a significant amount of time in and outside of class reading and engaging with critical secondary sources. Both major papers will incrementally reflect this engagement.

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R1B section 2: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Have You Eaten? Cannibalism in Literature and Film

Livi Yoshioka

This Reading and Composition course will examine representations of cannibalism in texts from a wide variety of genres, from Greek mythology to comic books, from fairy tales to cartoons. Exploring different genres and forms will allow us to interrogate the wide-ranging social, historical, and political circumstances of these representations, while at the same time offering us the opportunity to develop a diverse set of tools for analyzing cultural texts, from the visual to the cinematic to the literary.

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R1B section 3: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- The Intersection of French Language and Identity

Maya Smith

The aim of the course is to inform students of the social aspects of the evolution of the French language, highlight the dynamic relationship between language and identity, and present a detailed picture of the diversity in the Francophone world.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

2: Elementary French, second semester

Seda Chavdarian in Charge

Continuing development of students' awareness of Francophone cultures, knowledge of fundamental structures of French, and their appropriate socio-linguistic application in both spoken and written communication.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

3: Intermediate French

Desirée Pries in Charge

This is an intermediate language and culture class that aims to consolidate and expand the skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing in French. The course aims to promote cross-cultural understanding through the use of authentic materials such as literary and journalistic texts, multimedia, film, pop songs, and television/radio broadcasts, and other cultural artifacts. We will explore various topics such as self and family, education, human relationships, traditions, politics, and national identities, and compare American and other perceptions to those of the French and francophone world in whole class discussion, small groups and other collaborative formats. In addition to a review and refinement of grammar and vocabulary in a culturally rich context, students also experiment with their written expression through different formats, including analytical essays, journals, creative writing and independent projects using the Internet.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

4: Advanced Intermediate French

Desirée Pries in Charge

French 4 is an advanced intermediate language and culture class that aims to refine the skills acquired in French 3 or equivalent courses and to introduce students to French and francophone literature. Emphasis is placed on the development of oral and written expression to promote linguistic and cultural competences through an extensive grammar review and exploration of spoken and written texts, as well as film, multi-media, and other cultural artifacts. We will read short stories, plays, poems and discuss their literary and cultural contexts (music, art, history, philosophy). Throughout the semester, students will share ideas in collaborative, small-group and whole class discussion, explore new formats for expository prose, continue journalistic and creative writing activities in French, and work on independent projects using the Internet.

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13: Intermediate Conversation

Richard Kern in charge

This course develops students' ability to speak and understand French in both conversational and formal contexts, enlarges vocabulary, and enhances familiarity with contemporary French culture. Activities include oral presentations, debates, collaborative projects, language journals. Class conducted entirely in French.

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14: Advanced Conversation

Richard Kern in Charge

Listening, reading and discussion of French sociocultural realities including economics, politics, popular culture, and family life at the beginning of the 21st century. Oral presentations, debates, collaborative projects, regular journal entries and assignments. Class conducted entirely in French.

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35: Practical Phonetics and Listening Comprehension

Nelly Timmons

This multimedia web-assisted course concentrates on pronunciation and listening comprehension skills. Because it concentrates on the first task confronted upon arrival in a French-speaking country (to understand and be understood), it has traditionally been considered very helpful before going to France for study, work, or travel.

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39C: Sophomore Seminar -- The Art of Love in Medieval and Early Modern France

Christopher Davis

Is love an emotion or an idea? Is it a universal human experience or a uniquely individual one? We will address these questions by examining the representation of love in a variety of literary texts, including medieval lyric and Romance, Early modern drama, the poets of the Pléiade and the essays of Montaigne. Readings and discussions will be in English. Enrollment open to students with freshman or sophomore standing. May be used to satisfy the Arts and Literature breadth requirement in Letters and Science.

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102: Writing in French, 3 sections ("W")

V. Rodic; S. Maslan; R. Shuh

This course introduces students to different modes of proposing and furthering a point of view or argument (whether in a critical essay, through dramatic metaphor, or in plays or short stories). Great attention is paid, both through the readings and through extensive written work, to questions of interpretation as well as to the logical and coherent development of reading and writing skills leading to correct and effective expression in French.

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103B: Language and Culture -- Art and Politics: The Surrealist Revolution ("W")

Soraya Tlatli

This course will discuss the artistic, political and psychoanalytical aspects of French Surrealism from its first expression in the early 1920’s to the aftermath of the Second World War. We will consider all the artistic components of this multi-faceted movement and our material will include textual sources such as prose, poetry and manifestos, but also films and paintings.

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120A: 20th Century Literature – French Nobel Laureates of the 20th Century

Rachel Shuh

Parmi les quatorze lauréats d’expression française, nous étudierons des auteurs et des textes qui représentent leur décennie ou leur génération littéraire et qui continuent à nous intéresser aujourd’hui. Nous chercherons à établir un parcours et à nous faire une idée du XXeme siècle en redécouvrant certains auteurs tombés dans l’oubli, d’autres d’une renommée mineure, et en relisant d’autres encore, restés célèbres. Le choix d’auteurs comprendra: Maeterlinck (1911), Anatole France (1921), Bergson/Proust (1927), Gide (1947), Camus (1957), Sartre (1964), Beckett (1969), Duras (prix Goncourt, 1984), Claude Simon (1985), Gao Xingjian (2000), Le Clézio (2008). (For a more detailed description, please click on course title).

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126: Senior Seminar -- George Sand Novels, Music, and Politics

Michael Lucey

George Eliot wrote of George Sand: “I cannot read six pages of hers without feeling that it is given to her to delineate human passion and its results . . . with such truthfulness such nicety of discrimination such tragic power and withal such loving gentle humour that one might live a century with nothing but one’s own dull faculties and not know so much as these six pages will suggest.” And yet George Eliot’s novels are very much read today by students of literature, and George Sand’s very little. Baudelaire, on the other hand, commented of Sand: “Elle est bête, elle est lourde, elle est bavarde.” In any case, she was one of the most widely read European novelists of the nineteenth century and yet most of her novels are never read today. We will explore her paradoxical reputation and writing through a reading of four novels, La dernière Aldini, Consuelo, Les maîtres sonneurs, and Adriani.

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138: French for Teaching and Related Careers

Richard Kern

This course will introduce students to the field of second language acquisition, considering specific issues in learning and teaching French. We will study models of second language acquisition, as well as a variety of approaches to the teaching of French as a foreign language. A special feature of the class will be weekly online collaboration with students at the École Normale Supérieure in Lyon, who will be enrolled in a similar course.

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140D: French Literature in English Translation – Cutting a path through Proust’s In Search of Lost Time

Suzanne Guerlac

Course taught in English In this class we will read selections from Proust's multi-volume In Search of Lost Time, tracing a path from beginning to end in manageable sections. Time, memory, subjectivity, sensation, sexuality, jealousy and art – these are some of the themes we will examine in our study of Proust’s celebrated modern novel.

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161A: A Year in French History -- Littérature, religion et politique sous Mazarin (1656-1661)(“R”)

DĂ©borah Blocker

Ce cours propose une étude approfondie de cinq années du XVIIe siècle français : les années 1656-1661. Il s’agit d’une période d’une grande richesse tant en ce qui concerne le développement de la littérature française, qu’en ce qui concerne la vie religieuse et politique. Nous explorerons en particulier : le rôle du patronage royal et aristocratique, les modalités la création artistique, les débats confessionnels, et le rapport entre littérature, histoire et polémique philosophique et/ou religieuse. Ce cours ("R") offre une initiation aux techniques de la recherche en littérature comme en histoire culturelle. À l’écrit comme à l’oral, on y travaillera en parallèle expression, documentation et argumentation.

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162: Perspectives on History -- Immigration in contemporary France -- Le Paris Arabe

Soraya Tlatli

This course is designed as an introduction to the history of North African immigration in France in the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries. We will first focus on the main historical events that rendered the massive North African immigration possible and sometimes unavoidable. We will pay a close attention to the various cultural ways in which the city of Paris has been shaped and transformed by immigration, throughout the twentieth-century.

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170: French Films – Introduction to Cinema

Ulysse Dutoit

This course will consider cinema as the art of movement, and violence and sensuality as manifestations of this movement. We will study the basic vocabulary of cinematographic language using films by Renoir, Vigo, Resnais and Godard.

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180A: French Civilization -- Fantastic Voyages, Fantastic Spaces in French Medieval Literature

Christopher Davis

This course will approach larger issues of cultural and national identity by examining the themes of travel and encounter with the other—both real and imagined—in medieval French texts.

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Graduate

210A: Studies in Medieval Literature -- The Romance of the Rose and the Tradition of Medieval Allegory

David Hult

This course will combine a detailed reading of the Roman de la Rose and its critical heritage with a study of the medieval tradition of allegorical writing. Class will be conducted in English and no knowledge of medieval French is presupposed, though reading knowledge of modern French will be helpful, as the Rose will be read in a dual-language edition, with facing page Old French and modern French translation. Since the class will center on close readings, a certain amount of class time will be reserved for discussion of linguistic and translation issues.

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230A: Studies in 17th Century French Literature -- Molière: Stage, Page, Patronage

Nicholas Paige

Our seminar will take the measure of the main lit-critical approaches to Molière's theatre, as well as canvass more recent attempts to understand his work in the context of the institutions that shaped it. Readings in French and English; discussions mostly in French but English speakers welcomed

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245B: Early Modern Studies -- Topics in the History of the Book and Manuscript Studies -- The Circulation Of the Written Word In Early Modern France and Italy (1450-1800)

DĂ©borah Blocker

This seminar introduces students to the fundamentals of book history (the invention of the printing press, development and policing of the book market, and the material forms of the book), but also to what in the field is now called scribal culture, that is the continued circulation of manuscripts during the age of the printing press and, more generally, the lasting and constant competition between books and manuscripts in the high culture of early modern Europe. The main aim of this seminar is to provide students with a wide panorama of how the written world circulated in early modern Europe. Its central practical purpose it to make students more capable of finding, analyzing, and adequately using print and manuscript sources they will need to study in the context of their dissertations.

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250A: Studies in 19th Century French Literature -- Countercurrents

Suzanne Guerlac

This seminar will focus mainly on the first half of the 19th c. and examine literary and non literary works that are central to grasping developments that prepare the way for what we call the “modernism” of the second half of the century. We plan to conduct this seminar as a real seminar, with students setting up research /writing projects for themselves early in the semester and leading the way in the discussion of the works they have chosen for us to read.

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270B: Literary Criticism -- What Literary Form Can Do -- Bourdieu, Sartre, and Genette with Flaubert, Mallarmé, and Proust

Michael Lucey

How and why do we relate to culture and to cultural objects? What do culture and its objects do for us? In this seminar we’ll have a chance to look in some detail at both Bourdieu’s Les règles de l’art and La distinction, two of the most imposing works of twentieth-century French critical thought, as part of an effort to understand what literary works do, how, via the work of form, they become instruments of analysis that provide us with a critical experience both of language and of the world.

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Pedagogical

302: Teaching French in College – Advanced First Year

Seda Chavdarian

Provides an understanding of the teaching methods used in French 2, to help instructors effectively implement techniques specifically designed for the French language classroom at Berkeley.

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303: Teaching in French, Advanced Level

Desirée Pries

Provides an understanding of the teaching methods used in French 3 and 4, to help instructors effectively implement techniques specifically designed for the French language classroom at Berkeley.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes