Courses available in French

Courses

Tout est dit, et l’on vient trop tard.

— La Bruyère

2013 Fall

Graduate | Pedagogical

Undergraduate

1: Elementary French, first semester

Seda Chavdarian in Charge

Introduction to Francophone cultures through speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French, with French as the exclusive means of communication. Emphasis is placed on developing student ability to create and to communicate with basic French structures and vocabulary.

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R1A, section 1: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- (F)acts or Fiction? Finding Fiction in Literature and Life

A. Skrzypczynska

This course will examine the ways in which literature and film expose and engage with the relationship between fact and fiction, be this relationship one of distinction, ambiguity, or both. French R1A satisfies the first half of the Reading and Composition Requirement. Classes are conducted in ENGLISH.

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R1A, section 2: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Speak, Memory -- Reflections on the Photograph

D. Hoffmann

This course will explore the various relationships (both harmonious and troubled) between photography and memory. More specifically, we’ll look at the ways in which photography has shaped various writerly relationships to the past, both in autobiography and in fiction. French R1A satisfies the first half of the Reading and Composition Requirement. Classes are conducted in ENGLISH.

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R1B, section 1: English Composition through French Literature in Translation -- Literary Inventions of Speech

M. Smith

From rhetorical flair, improvisatory performance and conversation to stuttering, listening and silence, we will consider a wide-range of speech phenomena as represented or invented in literary and philosophic texts. This course fulfills the second half of the Reading and Composition Requirement in the College of Letters and Science. Class conducted in ENGLISH.

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2: Elementary French, second semester

Seda Chavdarian in Charge

Continuing development of students' awareness of Francophone cultures, knowledge of fundamental structures of French, and their appropriate socio-linguistic application in both spoken and written communication.

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3: Intermediate French

Desirée Pries in Charge

This is an intermediate language and culture class that aims to consolidate and expand the skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing in French. The course aims to promote cross-cultural understanding through the use of authentic materials such as literary and journalistic texts, multimedia, film, pop songs, and television/radio broadcasts, and other cultural artifacts. addition to a review and refinement of grammar and vocabulary in a culturally rich context, students also experiment with their written expression through different formats, including analytical essays, journals, creative writing and independent projects using the Internet.

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13: Intermediate Conversation

R. Kern in charge

This course develops students’ ability to speak and understand French in both conversational and formal contexts, enlarges vocabulary, and enhances familiarity with contemporary French culture.

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102: Writing in French, 3 sections ("W")

This course introduces students to different modes of proposing and furthering a point of view or argument (whether in a critical essay, through dramatic metaphor, or in plays or short stories). Great attention is paid, both through the readings and through extensive written work, to questions of interpretation as well as to the logical and coherent development of reading and writing skills leading to correct and effective expression in French.

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103A: Language and Culture -- Reading Lyric Language ("W")

C. Davis

This course introduces students to lyric poetry in French, focusing on Medieval and Early Modern traditions. How is the language of poetry different from other kinds of language? What are the grammatical and rhetorical conventions that make language lyrical? What kinds of emotional or subjective experiences is lyric language used to express? Readings for the course will be in modern French.

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112A : Medieval French Literature

D. Hult

The subject of this course is the most creative period of medieval literature, in which the epic still flourished but courtliness and the romance were born. Most of the texts will be read in modern French, but instruction in the Old French language will be an important component of the class and key passages will be read in their original linguistic form.

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118A: Eighteenth Century Literature -- What is Enlightenment? ("W")

S. Maslan

At the end of the eighteenth century Immanuel Kant tried to answer the question: What is Enlightenment? He came up with this answer: The Enlightenment was the time during which and the process by which human beings finally emerged from their own self-imposed childhood. More recent scholars accuse the Enlightenment of having constructed a “universal man” who is nothing but a cover for white, western, male power. In this class we will try to decide for ourselves through readings of classic authors of the period as well as secondary works.

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120B: Twentieth-Century Literature --Wars, Revolts, Literatures. Midnight in the 20th Century

E. Colon

This course will explore the relationships between aesthetic innovations and political writing from the 1940s onwards. We’ll mainly focus on writers published by Les Éditions de Minuit, between the 1940s and 2012, using this famous publishing house as a guide through 20th century French literary history.

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121A: Literary Themes, Genres, Structures -- Theater and Power in Seventeenth-Century France

D. Blocker

This class investigates the emergence of French classical theater under Louis XIII and Louis XIV by studying how monarchical power interacted with this new genre. Students will be invited to think about the development of new theatrical practices in a specific historical context, that of the rise of absolutism. It will also allow them to reflect on the origins of modern drama more generally.

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140B: French Literature in English Translation -- The Crafting of the French Philosopher -- from Montaigne to Sartre

D. Blocker

In France, the figure of the public intellectual has a long, eventful and often fascinating history. This survey class introduces students to this social and intellectual tradition by examining some of the ways in which the philosopher became an essential part of French culture. The class asks why and how the public practice of philosophy became, in France, a distinct social, institutional and even political possibility. Course conducted in English.

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146A: Introduction to French Linguistics

M. McLaughlin

This course provides an introduction to the linguistic analysis of Modern French. Students will develop the basic skills of linguistic analysis in order to understand how the French language works. We consider four different levels: the phonology (sounds), the morphology (internal structure of words), the syntax (ordering of elements within the phrase) and the lexis (vocabulary).

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180C: French Civilization -- The Experience of Modernity in 19th-Century Paris

D. Sanyal

This course explores the experience and representation of urban modernity in 19th century Paris. Drawing on classic literature of the period along with readings in cultural criticism and art history, we will consider the novel as a laboratory for new forms of knowledge and representation.

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185: Literature and Colonialism -- Vivre dans les colonies

S. Tlati

Dans ce cours nous étudierons, à travers un ensemble de témoignages littéraires ainsi que de films, la manière dont des écrivains tels que Marguerite Duras, Albert Camus, Mouloud Feraoun, Jean Pierre Sénac et Amrouche, ont décrit leurs expériences vécues pendant la colonisation. Sur le plan historique, nous nous interrogerons sur la façon dont l’idéologie coloniale s’est adressé aux enfants à travers un réseau d’images et de récits.

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Graduate

201: History of the French Language

M. McLaughlin

This course covers the history of the French language from its Latin roots through to contemporary usage. Both internal and external History will be considered so that students acquire a firm grounding in the linguistic evolution of the language, coupled with an understanding of its development in relation to a range of social and cultural phenomena.

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211A : Reading and Interpretation of Old French Texts

D. Hult

Introduction to the study of medieval French language and literature of the 12th and 13th centuries.

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220A : Studies in 16th-Century Literature -- Travel and Narrative in Early Modern France

T. Hampton

In this seminar we will study the intersection between major works of French Renaissance literature and the rich body of "travel literature" that begins to be produced during the period--both in response to the "voyages of discovery" to the Americas and Asia, and in response to increasing engagement between France and the Ottoman Empire.

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230B: Studies in 17th-Century Literature -- Louis XIV: The Court and Culture of Absolutism

N. Paige

This course, co-taught with Prof. Peter Sahlins (History), will introduce students to a range of work on early modern court societies via a consideration of the paradigmatic example of such a society, Louis XIV's "absolutist" court.

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251: Francophone Literature -- Rewriting the Hexagon -- Metropolitan Reflections in Francophone Literature

K. Britto

For almost a century, francophone writers have been concerned with the various cultural, political, and economic dynamics that shape the experiences of colonial and postcolonial subjects who travel to France. In this seminar, we will read and discuss several texts, dating from the 1930s onward, that foreground movement to (and from) the metropole.

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Pedagogical

301: Teaching French in College: First Year

S. Chavdarian

This course (1) provides participants with an understanding of basic principles of first- and second-language acquisition and the theoretical underpinnings of commonly used language teaching methods, and (2) offers inservice training in teaching, in creating and adapting instructional materials, and in designing tests for use in the Lower Division Program in French.

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