Courses available in French

Courses

Tout est dit, et l’on vient trop tard.

— La Bruyère

2012 Fall

Graduate | Pedagogical

Undergraduate

1: Elementary French, first semester

S. Chavdarian

Introduction to Francophone cultures through speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French, with French as the exclusive means of communication. Emphasis is placed on developing student ability to create and to communicate with basic French structures and vocabulary.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

R1A: English Composition through French Literature in Translation: Death And All Its Dealings

Maya Smith

This course serves as an introduction to literary analysis and as a guide to the composition of well-argued essays. This will be accomplished by class discussion, by breaking down essay-writing into manageable components, and by extensive rewriting. French R1A fulfills the first half of the Reading and Composition Requirement in the College of Letters and Science. All readings and lectures are in ENGLISH.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

R1B: English Composition through French Literature in Translation: Bad Romance -- Love Triangles and the Novel

S. Battis

The Hellenistic novel of the 340s bce was the pulp fiction of Antiquity. Extremely formulaic, the plot centers on the trials and tribulations that take place before a man and a woman in love are reunited. Their fidelity to each other is constantly challenged by the desires of others. The resulting narrative reinforces the traditional idea that mutual eros (desire) between social equals is key to a happy union.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

2: Elementary French, second semester

S. Chavdarian

Continuing development of students' awareness of Francophone cultures, knowledge of fundamental structures of French, and their appropriate socio-linguistic application in both spoken and written communication. Class conducted entirely in French.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

3: Intermediate French

D. Pries in charge

This is an intermediate language and culture class that aims to consolidate and expand the skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing in French. The course aims to promote cross-cultural understanding through the use of authentic materials such as literary and journalistic texts, multimedia, film, pop songs, and television/radio broadcasts, and other cultural artifacts. We will explore various topics such as self and family, education, human relationships, traditions, politics, and national identities, and compare American and other perceptions to those of the French and francophone world in whole class discussion, small groups and other collaborative formats. In addition to a review and refinement of grammar and vocabulary in a culturally rich context, students also experiment with their written expression through different formats, including analytical essays, journals, creative writing and independent projects using the Internet.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

13: Intermediate Conversation

Richard Kern in charge

This course develops students' ability to speak and understand French in both conversational and formal contexts, enlarges vocabulary, and enhances familiarity with contemporary French culture. Activities include oral presentations, debates, collaborative projects, language journals. Class conducted entirely in French.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

102: Writing in French, 3 sections ("W")

The Staff

This course introduces students to different modes of proposing and furthering a point of view or argument (whether in a critical essay, through dramatic metaphor, or in plays or short stories). To this end, we read passages from a variety of works, such as critical essays, novels, and plays, in order to study their use of language, their structure, and their tactics of persuasion. Through readings on problems of language and the visual arts, we explore the ways in which words and images structure thought, communication and interactions of individuals and societies. Great attention is paid, both through the readings and through extensive written work, to questions of interpretation as well as to the logical and coherent development of reading and writing skills leading to correct and effective expression in French.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

103A: Language and Culture: Writing Love ("W")

S. Guerlac

Love can be intensely personal but the forms of its literary expression -- and even of its experience – can be socially codified. There are ideologies of love. Love can find itself in conflict with other values. And of course love can be happy or unhappy -- or both at the same time. A love story can be a pretext for saying something else altogether. Love can be idealized or demystified. We will explore these possibilities through the study of texts from various genres ( prose narrative, theatre and poetry) from the middle ages to the 20th century.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

112B: Medieval French Literature: Continuity and Change in Thirteenth-Century French Literature

D. Hult

This course provides an introduction to medieval French literature, starting with some of the most important courtly works of the late twelfth century and tracing their adapations in selected major works of the thirteenth century. Among the topics will be the nature and appearance of courtly poetry, the invention of romantic love, the transmission of Celtic themes in the matière de Bretagne, the legend of King Arthur and the myth of the Grail, the early comic traditions, and early theater.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

http://osoc.berkeley.edu/OSOC/osoc?y=8&p_term=FL&p_deptname=French&p_classif=--+Choose+a+Course+Classification+--&p_presuf=--+Choose+a+Course+Prefix%2fSuffix+--&p_course=118&x=49118A: Eighteenth Century French Literature: How To Say I Love You -- The Comedies of Marivaux

N. Paige

This class provides an introduction to Marivaux's world. The center of our interest will be a select number of his plays--their language (the playwright introduced an entire way of speaking known as marivaudage) and their form (we will learn about the comedic conventions that Marivaux appropriates and twists). We will also research the social institution of the theater in Ancien RĂ©gime France, and read some studies that connect these apparently light romantic comedies with the deep social and subjective changes that characterize modernity.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

119A: Nineteenth-Century Literature: Ecrire le réel, écrire l’irréel

S. Guerlac

The 19th century is famous for the realist novel. But is was also the period of the fantastic tale. A number of authors wrote in both modes. We will examine how writers try to persuade us that the fictions they present are real? How do they invite us to grant a compelling (and sometimes creepy) “reality” to what we know cannot be true?

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

140D: French Literature in English Translation: An Introduction to the Films of the French New Wave

N. Paige

Though by many accounts a mere four-year phenomenon, the French New Wave is arguably the most emblematic movement in the history of modern cinema, one that continues to inspire filmmakers from Los Angeles to Teheran to Hong Kong. This class provides a comprehensive overview of the movement and its major films, with attention to the cultural and theoretical factors that help explain this extraordinary flowering of filmmaking talent in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

142AC: The Cultures of Franco-America

K. Britto

In this course, we will consider a broad range of literary and cultural texts that emerge out of the long history of the French in North America and of Americans in France. Our readings will include novels, poetry, and short stories—including the earliest known work of African American fiction, written in French and published in Paris in 1837.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

146A: Introduction to French Linguistics

R. Kern

Ce cours est destiné aux étudiant(e)s qui désirent se familiariser avec les bases de la linguistique française. Aucune expérience en linguistique n’est requise, mais une bonne connaissance du français parlé et écrit s’impose. Le cours abordera les domaines principaux de la linguistique : la phonétique et la phonologie, la morphologie, la syntaxe, la sémantique, et la pragmatique, ainsi qu’une briève introduction à la sociolinguistique.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

175A: Literature and the Visual Arts: Colonial Literature and Cinema from the thirties to the present

S. Tlatli

A comparison between films and narratives about the making and demise of the French empire. We will read various narratives about the imperial presence in the French colonies and compare them with a series of films from the 20th and 21st century.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

183A: Configurations of Crisis: Histories and Memories of the Occupation in French Literature and Cinema

D. Sanyal

An inquiry into the history and memory of Occupied France through a range of cultural production: novels, essays, poetry, theatre and cinema. We will focus on representations of the Occupation; the literature of Resistance; art under Nazi censorship; Vichy France and collaboration; war and the colonies; antisemitism and the Holocaust.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

Graduate

200: Proseminar in French

Dept. Chair

This course gives new graduate students a broad view of the French Department faculty, the courses they teach, and their fields of research. In addition, it will introduce students to some practical aspects of their graduate career, issues that pertain to specific fields of research, and questions currently being debated across the profession. All French Department graduate students are welcome to those meetings devoted to more general practical and intellectual topics. 1 unit.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

211A: Reading and Interpretation of Old French Texts

D. Hult

Introduction to the study of medieval French language and literature of the 12th and 13th centuries. Through a careful analysis and critical interpretation of certain canonical works (La Chanson de Roland; Béroul and Thomas, Tristan; selected lais of Marie de France; selected romans of Chrétien de Troyes; Le Roman de la Rose) we will study Old French language and some main dialects; verse and prose composition; theories of the oral tradition; editorial problems; and the material aspects of the manuscript work (including some work on codicology and paleography).

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

240B: Studies in Eighteenth-Century Literature: The Enlightenment and its Enemies

S. Maslan

In this seminar we will explore the contested world of enlightenment France itself by reading canonical eighteenth-century writers along with some of their now less-known enemies. We will also take on the major scholarly and critical debates about the enlightenment that have raged from Adorno and Horkheimer until today. Major topics will be secularization and toleration; slavery and colonialization; sexuality and the family.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

245A: French Society in the Old RĂ©gime (1600-1800) - History, Literature, Culture

D. Blocker

This seminar introduces students to the historiography of early modern French society (1600-1800), by comparing modern historiographical writings on the topic to a variety of literary texts ­ plays, novels, mémoires and social satire ­ from the 17th and 18th centuries, which depict early modern French society or reflect on particular social problems.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

251: Francophone Literature: Le nationalisme -- Mourir pour la patrie en Orient et dans l’Occident

S. Tlatli

Dans ce séminaire sur le nationalisme, nous analyserons un certain nombres de textes, (essais, romans et pieces de theatre) consacrés à la passion politique qui peut mener à mourir pour sa patrie.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

260A: Studies in 20th-Century Literature: Littérature et engagement - Autour de Sartre et Camus

D. Sanyal

In this seminar, we will read the major literary works of Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus with a view to recreating their dialogues, debates and differences on the relations between aesthetics, politics, history and ethics.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes

Pedagogical

301: Teaching French in College: First Year

S. Chavdarian

This course (1) provides participants with an understanding of basic principles of first- and second-language acquisition and the theoretical underpinnings of commonly used language teaching methods, and (2) offers inservice training in teaching, in creating and adapting instructional materials, and in designing tests for use in the Lower Division Program in French.

Section times and locations in the Schedule of Classes